NATIONAL REGISTRY OF CPE SPONSORS

NASBA

What Sponsors Need to Know

My organization is applying for membership to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.  Do you have tips or recommendations to help with the application process?  

The Registry team has identified the top 5 application errors that we hope you will avoid:

1. Miss-matched documentation

The initial application requires submission of one program.  Requested documentation should relate to the submitted program.  For example, course ABC was submitted.  Therefore, the promotional material, evaluation and certificate of completion should reflect information from course ABC. 

2. Omission of biographical data for program instructor(s) and reviewer(s)

The Standards require learning activities to be developed and reviewed by subject matter experts. This could be met by individual instructor(s)/reviewer(s) or through a team of subject matter experts. The application requires organizations to submit separate biographical data for the instructors/developers and the reviewers. Why have a separate reviewer? The reviewer provides assurance that the program is technically accurate and that the learning activities support the program’s stated learning objectives.

3. Omission of content development information

The program content development section covers program content development policies which include details on how the sponsor determines course learning objectives, program knowledge level, the qualifications of subject matter experts and other matters related to content development. These policies are an overview of course development policies for all programs offered for NASBA-approved CPE credits.

4. Inappropriate program knowledge level classifications   

The Standards specify five program knowledge levels: basic, intermediate, advanced, update and overview. Properly assigned program levels allow the participant to determine if he or she has the appropriate background to take the course. Let’s review an example of an improperly assigned program level.

Example

A sponsor classified a program as intermediate and listed the following details: “There are no prerequisites for this course. However, participants are expected to have a foundation of accounting skills through prior education or relevant work experience.”

Why is this an improperly assigned program level? Intermediate, advanced and update program levels inherently build upon a previous knowledge or skill; this means sponsors must clearly state that previous knowledge or skill in precise terms in promotional material.

5. Calculating CPE credits incorrectly

Sponsored learning activities are measured by actual program length, with one 50-minute period equal to one CPE credit. Only learning content portions of programs qualify toward eligible credit amounts. Time for activities outside of actual learning content including, for example, welcome and introductions, housekeeping instructions, and breaks is not accepted toward credit.

Sponsors may round down CPE credits awarded to the nearest one-fifth, one-half, or whole credit at their discretion and as appropriate for the instructional delivery method; however, the CPA claiming CPE credits should refer to respective state board requirements regarding acceptability of one-fifth and one-half CPE credits.

What’s the best way to calculate the CPE credits? Add up all of the minutes that comprise learning content of a program and then divide by 50. For learning activities in which segments are classified in multiple fields of study, the CPE credits granted should first be computed based on the content time of the total program.  Next, the CPE credits granted should be allocated to the fields of study based on the field of study content time.  If the sum of the individual segments by field of study content time does not equal the CPE credits computed based on the content time for the total program, then the difference should be allocated to the primary field of study for the program. 

My organization is applying for the QAS Self Study delivery method.  Do you have tips or recommendations to help with the application process?

1. Course Access Information

You must submit a complete program for review. NASBA reviewers look for components that are specific to QAS Self Study. For this reason, NASBA reviewers must have log-in information to begin the review process. Failure to include this information will result in a longer processing time.

2. CPE Calculation Documentation

QAS Self Study sponsors can choose two methods for calculating CPE credits. The two methods are pilot testing and the word count formula. Each method requires different supporting CPE calculation documentation, which is clearly specified in Standard No. 17.

3. Biographical Data 

Learning activities must be developed and reviewed by individuals or teams that are subject matter experts. Why have a separate reviewer? The reviewer provides assurance that the program is technically accurate and addresses the program's stated learning objectives. We require biographical information to verify the expertise of the developers and reviewers. Review Standards Nos. 4 and 5 for more details on the requirements of developers and reviewers.

4. Review Questions and Answers and Feedback

QAS self study sponsors are required to use program materials that "guide the participant through the learning process." Sponsors provide guidance through the use of review questions that must include evaluative and reinforcement feedback. Be sure to review Standard No. 8 for guidance in determining in appropriate review question types and proper feedback.

5. Qualified Assessment

QAS Self Study are required to "provide evidence of satisfactory completion of the course." To meet the requirement, self study programs must require participants to successfully complete a qualified assessment with a minimum passing grade of 70%. Be sure to include an answer key with the qualified assessment when submitting the application. For more details on final examination requirements, review Standards No. 9, paragraph 4.


Download the PDF

What is the difference between Group Live, Group Internet Based and QAS Self Study when it comes to the actual instructional methods?

The Standards define Group Live programs as “synchronous learning in a group environment with real time interaction of an instructor or subject matter expert that provides the required element of attendance monitoring and engagement." 

Whether a program is classified as group live or group Internet based is determined by how the participant consumes the learning (in a group setting or on an individual basis) and not by the technology used in program delivery. Group live examples include but are not limited to:

  • classroom setting with a real time instructor
  • participation in a group setting calling in to a teleconference
  • participation in a group setting watching a rebroadcast of a program with a real time suject matter expert facilitator

 

A Group Internet Based program is defined as “Individual participation in synchronous learning wtih real time interaction of an instructor or subject matter expert and built-in processes for attendance and interactivity." 

Whether a program is classified as group live or group Internet based is determined by how the participant consumes the learning (in a group setting or on an individual basis) and not by the technology used in program delivery. Group Internet based examples include but are not limited to:

  • participation in a webcast individually
  • participation in a broadcast of a group live presentation on an individual basis
  • participants calling in to a conference call on an individual basis

 

But what is an acceptable monitoring procedure? Sponsors have discretion in determining the most appropriate monitoring procedures. You can use polling questions, code words at random intervals or a combination of these. If you use polling questions, you must include three polling questions per CPE credit.

A QAS Self Study program is “an educational program completed individually without the assistance or interaction of a real time instructor."  QAS Self Study programs can be taken online or may be paper-based. These programs require the completion of a qualified assessment with a passing score of 70.

Also, this delivery method has two methodologies to determine CPE credits. CPE credits can be determined through a pilot test or a word count formula under the Standards. For more detail on these two methods, please review Standard No. 17 of the Standards.

Where can I get an invoice?

PUT LINK TO CONTACT US FORM

What are the most common mistakes made on promotional materials?

  • Learning objectives not clearly identified
  • Program level category misclassified
  • Prerequisite and advanced preparation statement omitted
  • Complaint contact information omitted
  • Clear statement of delivery method omitted


See sample template for compliant promotional material

What are the requirements of program knowledge levels in promotional materials?

The Statement on Standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Programs (Standards) specifies five program levels: basic, intermediate, advanced, update and overview. Properly assigned program knowledge levels allow the participant to determine if he or she has the appropriate background to take the course. Let’s review the definitions of the specific program levels covered in the Standards.

Basic – Program knowledge level most beneficial to CPAs new to a skill or an attribute. These individuals are often at the staff or entry level in organizations, although such programs may also benefit a seasoned professional with limited exposure to the area.

Intermediate – Program knowledge level that builds on a basic program, most appropriate for CPAs with detailed knowledge in an area. Such persons are often at a mid-level within the organization, with operational or supervisory responsibilities, or both.

Advanced – Program knowledge level most useful for individuals with mastery of the particular topic. This level focuses on the development of in-depth knowledge, a variety of skills, or a broader range of applications. Advanced level programs are often appropriate for seasoned professionals within organizations; however, they may also be beneficial for other professionals with specialized knowledge in a subject area.

Overview – Program knowledge level that provides a general review of a subject area from a broad perspective. These programs may be appropriate for professionals at all organizational levels.

Update – Program knowledge level that provides a general review of new developments. This level is for participants with a background in the subject area who desire to keep current.

All programs identified as intermediate, advanced or update must clearly identify prerequisite education, experience, and advanced preparation in precise language so that potential participants can readily ascertain whether they qualify for the program. For courses with a program knowledge level of basic and overview, prerequisite education or experience and advanced preparation must be noted, if any, otherwise, state "none" in course announcement or descripitve materials (promotional material.) 

Sponsors are often challenged in developing effective prerequisites. Let’s take a look at two examples to distinguish between a weak prerequisite and a more effective one.  

Example 1 (weak)

“You must be a college graduate to take this training program.”

Why is this a weak prerequisite? First, all licensed Certified Public Accountants (CPAs) are college graduates. Second, “college graduate” is vague. Do you want the graduate to have a specific course concentration such as business or accounting? Do you want the graduate to have a certain major? If so, this should be clearly stated in the prerequisite.  

Example 2 (effective) 

“Participants must have 3 years of experience at the supervisory or above level in reviewing transactions processed through the accounting ledger.”

This is an effective prerequisite because it is specific. The sponsor clearly identified 3 years of experience at a certain level (supervisory or above) in a certain area or function.  

Sponsors should make every attempt to equate program content and level with the backgrounds of the intended participant. Properly assigning the program knowledge level and identifying the exact prerequisite education and experience levels allow sponsors to meet this requirement.

As a CPE provider, what are my responsibilities for attendance monitoring and record keeping for a CPE program?

CPE program sponsors are required to monitor group learning participants to assign the correct number of CPE credits. A participant’s self-certification of attendance alone is not sufficient.

For the Group Live delivery method, the most common method of attendance monitoring is the use of sign-in/sign-out attendance logs. However, that method may not be the best choice for every CPE event scenario. We have had sponsors use proctors/event administrators to monitor attendance; use stickers on attendance sheets for attendance at individual sessions within an event; use code submissions through mobile devices using technology such as Poll Everywhere; and use bar code scanning for large events. Attendance monitoring methods are at the sponsor’s discretion. The key is that the attendance monitoring should provide the CPE program sponsor with a level of comfort, and ensure that the CPE credits awarded to a participant are accurate. For the Group Internet Based delivery method, CPE program sponsors must employ some type of real time monitoring mechanism to verify that participants are engaged for the duration of the course. The monitoring mechanism must be of sufficient frequency and lack predictability. Also, the monitoring mechanism must employ at least three instances of interactivity completed by the participant per CPE credit.

CPE program sponsors are required to retain adequate documentation regarding each CPE program event for a minimum of five years. Specific details on items to retain can be found in Standard No. 24. National Registry staff review this documentation during compliance audits. When reviewers are unable to confirm attendance, the lack of adequate documentation becomes an audit deficiency. At a minimum, sponsors must retain the following:

  • Records of participation
  • Dates and locations
  • Names and credentials of author/instructor, author/developer,  and reviewer, as applicable. For the CPA and tax attorney acting as an author/instructor, author/developer, and reviewer for accounting, auditing, or tax program(s), the state of licensure, license number, and status of license should be maintained. For the enrolled agent acting in such capacity for tax program(s), information regarding the enrolled agent status should be maintained.
  • Number of CPE credits earned by participants
  • Results of program evaluation
  • Information related to course development such as copies of program materials, evidence that the program materials were developed and reviewed by qualified parties, and a record of how CPE credits were determined.

Additionally, Standard No. 24 provides specific guidance on the documentation to retain by CPE program sponsors who are using the self-study delivery method for the determination of CPE credits using pilot testing or the word count formula methods.

Adherence to the Standards, NASBA policies and procedures shows the public that CPE program sponsors have an ongoing commitment to provide quality CPE programs. Moreover, there are supplementary benefits of proper documentation.

  •     Adds more value to CPE programs
  •     Cleaner and faster compliance audits
  •     Easier transition for employees with NASBA-compliance responsibilities
  •     Enhanced customer service to CPA participants

The application/form that I am completing has asked for a program listing.  What time period should my program list include?

The time period for the program listing depends on the type of application/form being completed.  If you are completing an initial application or an additional delivery method application, the program listing is forward-looking.  That is, we are looking for the program offerings planned for the upcoming 12-month period.

If you are completing a renewal application or responding to the desk audit process by completing the request for a program list, we are looking for the programs offered in the past 12 month period based on the sponsor’s renewal date.

For example, on July 1, 2016, you received your renewal application stating that your membership will expire on August 1, 2016 (renewal date).  Then, the requested program list to be submitted with your renewal application should cover the previous 12-month period based on the renewal date or August 1, 2015 through July 31, 2016.

For the compliance audit process, you will be notified of the audit time period through your audit acknowledgement form. You can also find the audit period timetable here.

​I received a request for modification regarding the non-compliance of the course learning objectives. How can I write compliant learning objectives?

The Standards state specifically that learning activities “must be based on relevant learning objectives and outcomes that clearly articulate the knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be achieved by participants in the learning activities.”

CPE program sponsors are required to provide learning objectives in the learning materials and promotional materials for the learner. This aids the learner in not only ensuring that the course content will provide the appropriate level of knowledge he is looking to obtain, but also the specific skill or ability with which he will walk away. The learning process is dependent directly upon properly developed learning objectives. To create strong learning objectives that will inform the learner of their intended outcome, utilize the acronym SMART. SMART learning objectives are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and targeted toward the learner.

Specific

The learning objective must focus on the specific skills, knowledge, and abilities that the student will be able to demonstrate at the end of the learning activity. Here is an example of a non-specific learning objective: “At the conclusion of this course the learner will understand fair value accounting.” This objective does not tell the learner what they will actually know or be able to accomplish regarding fair value accounting. Here’s a better version: “At the conclusion of this course, the learner will be able to list the three level hierarchy involved in estimating fair values.” This objective is specific. It identifies exactly what part of fair value accounting will be learned and the specific outcome that the learner will be able to demonstrate at the conclusion of the course.

Measurable

A learning objective must be specific enough to be measured. Using the specific example above, “the learner will list the three level hierarchy involved in estimating fair values at the end of the course,” the key behavior is defined by the verb list. To test this objective in a multiple-choice final exam would be difficult, if not impossible. To indicate a behavior that could be tested in a multiple-choice final exam, the objective could use the verb “identify” or “indicate” rather than “list.” Ensure that the verb that is chosen to determine action in the objective could actually be assessed in the method of assessment utilized within the program.

Attainable

The learning objective must be able to be mastered and measured in the time provided by the program. A learning objective that is too general would not necessarily be attainable in a given program. Ensure that the objective is attainable in respect to all restraints of timing, setting, and given materials of the program.

Relevant

When creating a learning objective, be sure that it is relevant to the perspective of the audience. Would a licensed CPA need to memorize basic accounting principles? No, basic accounting principles is knowledge that the CPA would already have acquired in order to become licensed.

Targeted

Learning objectives must be targeted to the student considering factors such as age, previous education, and previous experiences. What is important and relevant to your learners? Ensure that your objectives and course content are written with the learners in mind.

All National Registry Sponsors are required to base learning materials on relevant learning objectives that articulate the knowledge, skills, and abilities that can be achieved by participants. Make your objectives SMART and reach out to the Registry team if you have any questions!   

My application to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors was denied and I don’t agree with the findings. What can I do?

When potential CPE Program Sponsors apply to the National Registry of CPE Sponsors, they undergo an application review process. Sponsors are approved based on compliance with the Statement on Standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Programs (Standards) and National Registry policies. From time to time, organizations may not meet the Standards and receive an application denial from NASBA. Similarly, sometimes existing sponsors are removed from the National Registry for failure to maintain the Standards and National Registry policies.

The appeal process exists to provide potential applicants and existing sponsors with due process regarding an adverse decision. For more information of the appeals process, click here.

My company offers continuing education for several professional credentials, including the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) designation. Do I have different compliance responsibilities?

While the Standards are the framework for continuing education programs for CPAs, they do not prohibit sponsors from offering programs to a variety of other professions. NASBA recognizes that many CPAs hold multiple professional designations/credentials. Some of the more common credentials include: Certified Financial Planner, Certified Internal Auditor, Enrolled Agents, human resource professional certifications, life insurance agents, brokers and dealers.

When it comes to NASBA’s compliance responsibilities and working with multiple professions, there are two key areas that often result in compliance deficiencies.

The first area is course descriptive information (promotional material). Does a CPA know which programs qualify for NASBA-approved CPE credits? Is it easy for the CPA or other professional to find this type of information in the course promotional material? A sponsor should clearly state in course promotional material which programs and program delivery methods are acceptable for NASBA-approved CPE credits and which programs are developed for other professions or credentials.

The second area that frequently results in non-compliance surrounds the measurement of CPE. If you are a licensed attorney, you are required to take Mandatory Continuing Legal Education (MCLE). Did you know that MCLEs are measured on a 60-minute hour and credits are rounded down to the nearest hundredth of an hour? If you are a human resource professional, your continuing education units (CEUs) are measured on a contact hour. So that means 1 CEU equals 10 contact hours of participation in an organized event.

What does this mean for NASBA-approved sponsors? It means that CPE credits for CPAs are calculated on a 50-minute hour and round down to the nearest whole or half-hour increment. If you are offering continuing education credits for multiple professional designations, make sure the calculated credit for each designation is correct and the information is clearly communicated to program participants.

A sponsor should also maintain the credit calculations for each professional designation with its program documentation for reference and support.

How can I ensure that I get my Registry-related emails?

Registry emails are sent from a salesforce.com extension address (no-reply@salesforce.com). Depending on your company email security rules, Registry emails could be viewed as "spam" by the company's firewall. You can check with your IT department and let them know emails coming from the Registry are legitimate.

Emails are sent to the address of the designated main contact for your organization that is recorded in the National Registry database. If the address is incorrect, the email will bounce. Please be sure to let us know about email changes.

You also may not receive emails due to a change in the main contact, or the person responsible for communicating with NASBA and coordinating the Registry applications. When this person leaves the organization or assumes different responsibilities, the sponsor is required to notify NASBA by completing the "Notification of Change in Main Contact" form within 30 days of such change.

I am the person at my organization responsible for our membership with NASBA and the National Registry of CPE Sponsors. I am leaving the organization (or my role is changing at the organization). What do I need to do?

When there is a change in the person responsible for communicating with NASBA and coordinating the applications and renewals with the National Registry, the sponsor is required to notify NASBA by completing the “Notification of Change in Main Contact” form within 30 days of such change.

All communications from the National Registry, including the renewal applications, are sent to the email address of the designated main contact for your organization as recorded in the National Registry database. We understand that change is a constant in any business, and by notifying NASBA of changes in a timely manner, sponsors can avoid paying late renewal fees and missing out on pertinent CPE information such as updates on the CPE Standards revision process.

It is also important to note that changing the contact information to your organization’s profile on NASBARegistry.org does NOT update the contact information in the National Registry database. The “Notification of Change in Main Contact” form must be completed in order to change a contact in the National Registry database.

I am on NASBARegistry.org and can't seem to find the renewal application form. How do I receive the renewal form and when?

A sponsor cannot access a renewal application through the NASBARegistry.org website.  The renewal application process is initiated by the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.  Sponsors must renew their membership annually by the first day of the month of their initial approval date.  For example, if the sponsor’s initial approval date was May 17, 2015, then the sponsor must renew its membership by May 1st of each year.

The designated main contact for the organization will receive an email with instructions and the link to the online renewal application 30 days prior to that renewal date.  The email comes from a salesforce.com email extension address (no-reply@salesforce.com) with the subject line “National Registry Annual Renewal Application.”

Submission of the completed renewal application AND the appropriate renewal fees must occur by the first day of the renewal month.

A sponsor can remit payment for the renewal fee by credit card or check by selecting the link to the online renewal application within the email that corresponds to the intended form of payment.  Receipt of the renewal fees by the first day of the renewal month is required in order for the renewal to be considered paid in full regardless of payment by check or credit card.

Sponsors that do not submit their renewal form by the first day of the renewal month will be assessed a late fee penalty of 50% of the renewal fee. On the second day of the renewal month, the designated main and secondary contacts for the organization will receive an email notifying that a late fee is being assessed and will receive a revised invoice indicating the late fee adjustment.  When the late fee is not paid along with the renewal, it will be assessed through a separate invoice.  The late fee may be paid by credit card or check.

What do I submit with the renewal form?

The online renewal is a simple process. You answer a series of yes/no questions about your organization’s compliance with the Standards. You must submit a program listing of courses that awarded NASBA approved CPE credits during the preceding 12 months. You then pay online with several options. Be sure that you maintain the supporting documentation required by Standard No. 24 in the event that you are selected for a random compliance audit.

What do I do now that I have been selected for a random compliance audit?

The purpose of the compliance audit is to confirm the responses provided to NASBA during the most recently submitted self-certification online renewal. For more information on the compliance audit process, click here.

What are my compliance responsibilities if I (Registry sponsor) purchase content from an outside vendor?

 CPE sponsors may purchase courses from other vendors or course developers. However, the organization whose Registry ID is included on the certificate of completion is ultimately responsible for compliance with the Statement on Standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Programs (Standards) and NASBA requirements.

The Standards provide a framework for the development, presentation, measurement and reporting of CPE programs. There are more individual standards in the area of CPE program development than in the other categories, which demonstrates the importance and focus on CPE program development to ensure the highest quality of CPE for CPAs.

If a CPE program sponsor plans to issue certificates of completion under its name and Registry number, then the CPE program sponsor must first consider the purchased content based on whether the content was purchased from an entity registered with NASBA on the National Registry of CPE Sponsors.

If the content is purchased from another Registry sponsor, then it will be acceptable for the CPE program sponsor to maintain the author/developer and reviewer documentation from that Registry sponsor in order to satisfy the content development requirements of the Standards.

If the content is purchased from an entity not registered with NASBA on the National Registry, then the CPE program sponsor must independently review the purchased content to ensure compliance with the Standards. If the CPE sponsor does not have the subject matter expertise on staff, then the CPE sponsor may contract with a qualified individual to conduct the review. The CPE sponsor must maintain the appropriate documentation regarding the credentials/experience of both the course developer(s) and reviewer(s).

For more details on sponsor responsibilities if content is purchased from another entity, please review Standard No. 5, paragraph S5-02.

What are my compliance responsibilities if I (Registry sponsor) have contractual arrangements with clients?

The Statement on Standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Programs (Standards) provide a framework for the development, presentation, measurement and reporting of CPE programs. CPE sponsors have flexibility in how to achieve compliance with the Standards; however, the organization whose Registry ID is included on the certificate of completion is ultimately responsible for compliance with the Standards and NASBA requirements.

If a CPE program sponsor is going to issue certificates of completion under its name and Registry number, then the CPE program sponsor must maintain proper attendance records evidencing the Registry ID number provided on the certificate of attendance. The scenarios below describe the proper application of the Standards in circumstances where programs are provided in-house to a client’s employees and the certificates of completion will be issued under the CPE program sponsor’s Registry ID number.

Scenario 1: Promotion or announcement of client training events

A Registry sponsor enters into a contract with a client to hold a CPE session for the client’s employees. In the contract, the Registry sponsor and client agree to learning objectives and activities for the program and agree to compensation for the event based on the number of participants. The Registry sponsor will conduct the training if one or the maximum number of participants per the contract attends. The client may make the CPE program mandatory. Those factors do not remove the responsibility of the Registry sponsor to comply with Standard No. 12, which requires certain information be provided to enable the CPA to assess the appropriateness of learning activities. The Registry sponsor must either provide the required information directly to the participants or to the client to distribute to the participants.

If the participants of the program are employees of the client, then the Registry sponsor may use the requirements of internal training courses to provide program descriptive materials to participants. For reference, sample compliant templates of program descriptive materials (promotional/course announcement materials) may be found on the Sample Templates page.

Scenario 2:  Monitoring attendance and issuing certificates of completion

The set-up is the same as Scenario 1. The Registry sponsor will be compensated whether one or the maximum number of participants per the contract attends. The Standards place the responsibility of attendance monitoring on the sponsor. In addition, the Standards require that the Registry sponsor maintain records of participation, dates and locations of programs and number of CPE credits earned by participants. A best practice is to provide a sign-in and sign-out sheet at the session and have the client submit the attendance record to the Registry sponsor at the end of the learning event. The Registry sponsor will then issue the CPE certificates of completion and provide them to the client to distribute to the participants. The Registry sponsor should not provide the client with a certificate of completion template to generate certificates on their own.

For more details on sponsor responsibilities in attendance monitoring and issuing the certificate of completion, please review Standard Nos. 16 and 23.

What are my compliance responsibilities if I (Registry sponsor) sell services to CPE providers?

 A Registry sponsor may sell services to other CPE program sponsors (including Registry and non-Registry sponsors). These services could include providing platforms for delivering group Internet-based or self study programs or a learning management system. However, the organization whose Registry ID is included on the certificate of completion is ultimately responsible for compliance with the Statement on Standards for Continuing Professional Education (CPE) Programs (Standards) and NASBA requirements.

The Standards provide a framework for the development, presentation, measurement and reporting of CPE programs. There are more individual standards in the area of CPE program development than in the other categories, which demonstrates the importance and focus on CPE program development to ensure the highest quality of CPE for CPAs.

When providing services to other CPE program sponsors, if a CPE program sponsor plans to issue certificates of completion under its name and Registry number, then the CPE program sponsor must first consider who is providing the course content.

If the content is provided by another Registry sponsor, then it will be acceptable for the CPE program sponsor to maintain the author/developer and reviewer documentation from that Registry sponsor in order to satisfy the content development requirements of the Standards.

If the content is provided by an entity not registered with NASBA on the National Registry, then the CPE program sponsor must independently review the course content to ensure compliance with the Standards. If the CPE sponsor does not have the subject matter expertise on staff, then the CPE sponsor may contract with a qualified individual to conduct the review. The CPE sponsor must maintain the appropriate documentation regarding the credentials/experience of both the course developer(s) and reviewer(s).

For more details on program development requirements, please review the section on “Standards for CPE Program Development” in Standard No. 5, paragraph S5-02.

Provider Zone: What is the Provider Zone and how do I log in?

The Provider Zone allows you to manage your learning provider online listing on the Learning Market website. You can maximize your exposure by ensuring that you enter as much information as possible about your company.  While logged in to the Provider Zone, you can:

  • Manage the courses listed on LearningMarket.org by adding new courses or updating existing ones
  • Keep your profile current by updating company address, social media links and main contact information
  • Update and enhance your online listing by adding more detail about your company including uploading logos, videos, etc.

 

Login Instructions:

  1. Go to www.learningmarket.org
  2. Click on the "Provider Login" button (located on the right side of the home page):

  
Provider Login

  • Enter Login ID and Password and click “Submit”
    (If you do not remember your login, click on “Forgotten your login details?” and submit your email address)
     
  • You are now logged in to the Provider Zone
     

Tips for Navigating the Provider Zone:

  • Click on “Dashboard” at the top of the screen to return to the main page of the Provider Zone at any time
  • Click on “View Online Listing” to open your company profile in a new window
  • Always scroll down for more options
  • Use the “back” button on your browser to return to the previous screen
  • Always remember to logout!

Provider Zone: How do I list new courses on Learning Market or make changes to existing courses?

  1. Log in to your Provider Zone on www.learningmarket.org/pzone
  2. Click on the "Add Courses" button (located in the “Manage Your Courses” section
  3. To add a new course, click on “Add a new course” at the top of the sectio
  4. To edit an existing course, click on either the course title or the corresponding “Preview” link
  5. Enter all the course details following the instructions on the scree
  6. When complete, “Preview” the course then click “Publish” to make the course active on the Learning Market website


NOTES:

  • Courses listed as “Complete” are active and searchable on the website
  • Courses listed as “Inactive” are expired and are not currently listed on the website --- you can edit an expired course and update the “Course End Date” to make the course active again
  • If you have a large number of courses to add (50-100+), you can submit the data to be automatically uploaded --- more information can be found in the “Member Services” section of the Provider Zone

Provider Zone: How do I edit our company details and update the main contact listed on our Learning Market profile?

  1. Log in to your Provider Zone on www.learningmarket.org/pzone
  2. In the section “Update Your Company Details,” click on “Edit main contact details” to make changes to the contact listed on your Learning Market profile, or to grant access to an additional contact

    (if you are logged in as the main contact, you can also change the Login ID and Password for a contact, and “send login details” to their specified email address)

    (any changes made to the main contact in the Provider Zone will only be reflected on your Learning Market profile. If you wish to change the designated main contact on your National Registry account as well, click here to submit a "Change in Main Contact" form and complete the section on "Main Contact Change")

     
  3. Click on “Edit company contact details” to make changes to company mailing address, phone number or website, as well as to add any social media links

    (changes to the Company Name cannot be made here --- click here to submit a "Change in Main Contact" form and complete the section on "Organizational Name Change")
     
  4. Click on “Edit company profile” to add background information on your company and other pertinent information  

Tools to “Enhance Your Listing” can be found below the “company details” section. Here you can:

  • Upload a Company Logo
  • Upload a Video
  • Upload .PDF Brochures